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Important πŸ’₯ Things to Know πŸ’­ about Ocular Migraines 😣 ...

There are some things you should know about ocular migraines. Ever wonder what that odd shape is developing in your line of sight? It kind of looks like a snake puzzle toy from back in the day. Then, all of the sudden, BAM! It hits you. This excruciating headache that lasts the whole day, pounding inside your head with every step you take and every move you make. I know. That’s part of a song. But it’s true. It won’t go away no matter what you do. No brand of OTC pain medicine will relieve this kind of pain. All you can hope is to make it through the day or night even without dying. Here are the things you should know about ocular migraines.

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1. What Are Ocular Migraines?

One of the most important things you should know about ocular migraines is what exactly they are. This type of migraine is quite notable and a little scary to those it affects. It can start with the loss of vision in a small area of the eye. While focusing on that spot, a zig-zag figure with glimmering lights starts to appear. The figure can get longer, and vision continues to be lost in any area of the eyes. It’s been said that this happens in both eyes. If it happens in only one, seek medical attention right away.

2. Who Can It Happen to?

Ocular migraines can happen to anyone. It is said that they mostly occur in women though.

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3. When Can It Happen?

It can happen after eating a particular food, during pregnancy, in certain lighting conditions, with stress, etc. Anything that triggers olfactory sensors is another key. Hormone fluctuations can spark an onset as well.

4. Why Does It Happen?

There is no known cause of ocular migraines, but some researchers do say it seems to be hereditary.

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5. Can They Be Prevented?

Keeping a diary of what was done that day such as the food that was eaten, the activity being performed when the incident happened, or the experienced symptoms prior and after the onset may provide an idea of what to avoid in order to prevent future occurrences.

6. What Research Says?

Any kind of increase in frequent headaches should be directed to your doctor. There is the potential that blood clots, pinched nerves, or other things may be happening within the body that may be causing the headaches. It’s best to be safe rather than sorry.

Additional Informative Links:
allaboutvision.com
webmd.com
americanmigrainefoundation.org
healthline.com

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